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More Of The Same Is Not An Option For Health And Adult Social Care

MoreA new report published by a coalition of organisations sets out a refreshed commitment to transforming health, care and wellbeing services to improve people’s health and care.

‘Shifting the Centre of Gravity: Making place-based, person-centred health and care a reality’ is being launched by the Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners, Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Association of Directors of Public Health, the NHS Confederation and NHS Providers.

The report builds on the 2016 publication, ‘Stepping up to the place’, which stressed the importance of place-based, person-centred care delivering the outcomes that are important to people.

It highlighted the importance of care that is centred on each individual’s specific needs – and achieving this through a system where organisations and communities work together in a coordinated way on shared objectives and ambitions. This place-based integration should improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of their communities.

Care centred on the individual is a success story of integration because it is increasingly used as the basis for good practice across health, care and wellbeing.

The new report brings together the key elements of a successful integrated health and care system, and looks to identify how local systems can achieve the important shift towards place-based care. The health and care system is under pressure from an ever growing burden of ill health, frailty, and long term conditions. It is hoped that this report will help to set out a vision for a community-based preventative service which supports people to stay healthy and independent for as long as possible.

It recommends that the focus of transformation should be on:

Delivering care focused on the individual in or close to their homes with a focus on self-care and community engagement, so that people can lead healthier, more independent and fulfilled lives.

A population health focus, preventing poor health and reducing health inequalities by mobilising all the assets of organisations across a place to help people lead healthier, happier lives with less need to access health and care services.

These elements form the basis of a national vision for transformation, which is outlined as:

Every individual who uses a health or care service is able to say it was delivered in the right place and in a timely, joined-up way which respected their dignity.

Organisations working together to turn the tide of poor health so individuals, and communities become healthier, health inequalities are reduced and there is less demand on health and care services.

Making a success of integration through creating a collaborative culture among organisations involved in health, care and wellbeing.

Leaders working effectively across health and care to drive transformation.

Cllr Ian Hudspeth, Chairman of the LGA’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

“This report sends a clear message that when it comes to how health and adult social care is delivered, more of the same is not an option. We are fully committed to working together to transform health, care and wellbeing services to improve people’s health and care outcomes.

“The examples in this report show what can be achieved by organisations and staff from local government, the NHS, the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector, and service user and carer groups working together to improve health and deliver person-centred care.

“It sets out our refreshed, shared vision and the actions that will help local systems to progress their work on system-wide transformation.”

Julie Wood, Chief Executive of NHS Clinical Commissioners, said:

“The integration of health and social care is key to delivering truly person-centred care. We’re pleased to join with our partners across the system again to emphasise the role of all players – like our member CCGs – in place-based commissioning and delivery.

“Continuing to work towards these shifts will be essential if we are to achieve our shared

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