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Halloween Take Over At Buxton Lodge

HalloweenResidents and staff at Buxton Lodge care home in Caterham were in for a Halloween treat this year as festive celebrations kicked off at the Surrey-based care home.

To get residents in the spooky mood, they spent several days exchanging stories of their favourite childhood Halloween memories while also making bats and pumpkins for their display.

Buxton Lodge was donated a “ghost pumpkin” – painted in silver – which the on-site chef, Nina, carved and the residents had the opportunity to decorate it with lights and spiders.

Halloween Day saw some family members join residents, making it a real family affair.

Liz Shotter, a local pianist, provided music as staff and residents sang spooky songs and some old favourites. This was then followed by tea with Halloween-themed cakes.

Other activities ranged from playing splat the spider – a game where residents threw a soft jelly like spider at a target to earn points. Sidney took the crown with 25 points. The reward was some well-earned chocolate.

Staff joined in with the celebrations by dressing up in spooktacular fashion and residents donned some spooky hats. The day ended with everyone sharing their trick or treat sweets.

Theresa Stanton, Activity Coordinator at Buxton Lodge Care Home, said that days like this are vital for residents:

“It’s important to celebrate memorable days in the year as it helps our dementia residents to understand the seasons and to remember that Remembrance Day and Christmas are near”.

Buxton Lodge care home aims to deliver entertainment for their residents with a full calendar of fun events and social activities.

Buxton Lodge is part of the New Century Care group, an expert national care provider specialising in residential, nursing and dementia care, providing fulfilling lives to residents in a happy and homely setting. We care about care.

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