PM Urged To Support Commission On Health And Social Care

David-CameronDavid Cameron must be bold and hold a Commission on the future of health and social care, as the UK is facing monumental demographic challenges. And the government must build a model that is fit for purpose to meet the challenges posed by an ageing society and an underfunded care system. That’s according to an open letter to the Prime Minister signed by nearly 40 organisations including the charity Independent Age, the International Longevity Centre – UK, Care England, the National Care Forum, Carers UK, Macmillan Cancer Support, Marie Curie, Anchor, Leonard Cheshire Disability, Alzheimer’s Society and the National Council for Palliative Care.¹

Former Care Minister Norman Lamb MP (Lib Dem) has tabled a Bill², backed by two former Health Secretaries Stephen Dorrell (Con) and Alan Milburn (Lab) calling for a cross party Commission to review the future of health and social care in England.

The open letter urges the Prime Minister to:

  • Make the Commission a reality
  • Address the monumental demographic challenges in the UK which means nearly a quarter of the population will be over the age of 65 in just over twenty years’ time³
  • Recognise there is no room for complacency and ensure we have an NHS and social care system that is fit for purpose
  • Understand that if action isn’t taken it is the elderly, disabled people and their carers who will bear the brunt of inaction

Simon Bottery, Director of Policy and External Relations at Independent Age, the older people’s charity said:

“Without a robust health and care service that delivers for older people when they need it, the UK will never be truly prepared for ageing. A Commission on the future of health and social care is the vital first move towards recognising that the health and care systems cannot work in isolation – only when they work effectively together can the needs of older people be met. This is a conversation we cannot avoid if we are truly committed to ensuring older people have the quality of life they deserve. We urge the Prime Minister to back this Commission.”

David Sinclair, Director of the International Longevity Centre – UK, said:

“The UK is facing dramatic demographic change – in the next twenty years the number of people aged 85 and older will more than double to over three million. It is crucial that we are prepared for that change. We need to start talking now, honestly and openly, about what standards of health and care older people can expect now and in the future. Establishing this Commission would be an excellent step towards this and we hope the PM will listen to the calls being made today.”

Des Kelly OBE, Executive Director of the National Care Forum said:

“Despite several attempts to agree the structure to properly integrated care and health and a long term plan for future funding, this fundamental issue remains in the ‘too difficult to do’ pile. As a consequence services in both the care and health sectors are under severe strain and quality is beginning to suffer. The NCF urges the Prime Minister to support the proposal to establish a new Commission so that we can ensure that care and health services are made fit for the 21st century.”

¹ Organisations making the call to David Cameron:

Simon Bottery, Director of Policy and External Relations, Independent Age

David Sinclair, Director, International Longevity Centre – UK

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive, Care England

Des Kelly OBE, Executive Director, National Care Forum

Marcus Rand, Director, Campaign to End Loneliness

Jane Ashcroft CBE, Chief Executive, Anchor

Lynda Thomas, Chief Executive, Macmillan Cancer Support

Gillian Crosby, CEO, Centre for Policy on Ageing

Bridget Warr, Chief Executive, United Kingdom Homecare Association

Julienne Meyer CBE PhD, Professor of Nursing: Care for Older People, City University London and Executive Director of My Home Life programme

Jeremy Hughes CBE, Chief Executive, Alzheimer’s Society

Clare Pelham, CEO, Leonard Cheshire Disability

Jan Tregelles, Chief Executive, Mencap

Dr Jane Collins, CEO, Marie Curie

Claire Henry, CEO, The National Council for Palliative Care

Heléna Herklots, Chief Executive, Carers UK

Heidi Travis, CEO, Sue Ryder

Gail Scott-Spicer, CEO, Carers Trust

Michelle Mitchell, Chief Executive, MS Society

Richard Kramer, Deputy Chief Executive, Sense

Deborah Gold, Chief Executive, NAT (National AIDS Trust)

Jon Barrick, Chief Executive, Stroke Association

Robert Meadowcroft, Chief Executive, Muscular Dystrophy UK

David Scott-Ralphs, Chief Executive, SeeAbility

Ailsa Bosworth MBE, Founder and Chief Executive, National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

Lisa Lenton, England Director, Association for Real Change (England)

Rachael Byrne, Executive Director, Care and Support, Home Group

Ian Cumming MBE, Director of Communication, Guideposts

Jonathan Senker, CEO, VoiceAbility

Sue Adams OBE, Chief Executive, Care & Repair England

Brian Hutchinson, Chief Executive, Real Life Options

Alex Fox, CEO, Shared Lives Plus

Sue Browning, CEO, Spinal Injuries Association

Jenny Edwards CBE, Chief Executive, Mental Health Foundation

Tim Cooper, CEO, United Response

Irene Sobowale, CEO, The Disabilities Trust

Mike Adamson, CEO, British Red Cross

Dr Liam O’Toole, CEO, Arthritis Research UK

Roger Wicks, Director of Policy and Campaigns, Action on Hearing Loss

 

Full text of the letter:

Dear Prime Minister,

We welcome, and share, your aspiration to make Britain the best country in which to grow old.

That is why we were delighted to see three respected former Health Ministers (Norman Lamb (LD), Stephen Dorrell (Con) and Alan Milburn (Lab) calling for a cross-party Commission to review the future of health and social care in England.

The UK is facing monumental demographic challenges – nearly a quarter of the population will be over the age of 65 in just over twenty years’ time.  There is no room for complacency. We need to ensure we have an NHS and social care system that is fit for purpose otherwise it is the elderly, disabled people and their carers who will bear the brunt of inaction.

Bold long term thinking is required about the size, shape and scope of services we want the NHS and social care to provide – and an honest debate about how much as a society we are prepared to pay for them.

 

Lakeland2

 

 

QCS

 

 

CHSA

 

 

 

 

Fusion

 

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