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World War Memories Shared At Rotherham Care Home

WorldWarMEMORIES of the First and Second World Wars were shared at a Rotherham care home as residents took part in Remembrance Day activities.

Residents at Broadacres Care Home, on Naylor Street, Parkgate, have been painting poppies to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War.

They shared stories and were asked to write down what the poppies mean to them, so their memories could be added to displays around the home.

104-year-old Clarice Bloy recalled living through air raids in her childhood during the First World War.

She said: “Our family friend John would take my sister, Alice, and I down to the cellar when the air raids would start.

“We would hide behind things, covering our ears. We were very young, so it was really scary.

“Sometimes we were down there for a long time, so Alice taught me how to dance.

“She was a beautiful dancer, so we would have some fun, even through bad times.”

During an arts and crafts session run by community charity RotherFed, resident Monica Spencer, 95, spoke about working in a munitions factory during the Second World War.

She was one of 950,000 British women, nicknamed Canary Girls, to have worked in the factories during the war.

She said: “I was 15 when I thought I was going to work in a wool factory but instead I was taken to a steel factory to make bombs.

“It was really hard work but I was paid well, which would help my family out, as the men were either away fighting or were down the pits.

“The next year, I was moved to a button factory, which wasn’t as hard but still demanding. We only made navy or khaki coloured buttons for the Air Force and Army.”

Luke Owens, home manager at Broadacres Care Home, said: “We have run several arts and crafts sessions for the residents ahead of Remembrance Day.

“They’ve all really enjoyed making the poppies and sharing their memories. They have some incredible stories to tell and it’s amazing to hear what they experienced and lived through during those difficult times.

“We’d like to thank RotherFed for visiting us again and helping the residents to paint large poppies for our display ahead of our service on Sunday.”

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