Autonomy Project Survey Explores Human Rights In Care Homes

Dr Margot Kuylen

SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY AND ART HISTORY


A close up of an elderly man’s hands. He is holding a ball in one hand and the hand of a younger care worker is resting on his wrist

An ongoing Essex-led survey of care professionals will shed further light on concerns raised by the Care Quality Commission last week that Do Not Attempt CPR (DNACPR) orders in care homes have breached the human rights of residents.

The Survey of Care Home Professionals has so far surveyed more than 220 medical, social care, legal and advocacy staff working in or with care homes, and researchers in the School of Philosophy and Art History are hoping more will complete the survey before it closes on 4 April.

The survey, which launched at the start of the month, asks respondents questions relating to restrictions on movement and visits, access to services, the use of DNACPR orders, and the usefulness of guidance for practice.

Dr Margot Kuylen, Senior Research Officer, said: “Throughout the pandemic, there have been reports that the pandemic has interfered with the human rights of care home residents in the UK. This survey will help us understand better what has been happening on the frontline, and will provide some quantitative data to supplement the many anecdotal accounts that have appeared in the media.”

The survey is part of the Human Rights in Care Homes project, led by Professor Wayne Martin and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) COVID Rolling Call.

Dr Margot Kuylen said: “Together with the findings from the focus groups, the survey results will be used to help both care professionals and policy makers protect human rights in care homes going forward.”

The survey will be followed by a series of focus groups with selected care professionals, who will have an opportunity to explore the issues brought to light by the survey.

Dr Kuylen added: “Together with the findings from the focus groups, the survey results will be used to help both care professionals and policy makers protect human rights in care homes going forward.”

The research team plan to use the findings to develop a training curriculum for frontline care workers and will publish their final report on the findings later this spring.

The Human Rights in Care Homes project is part of the Essex Autonomy Project which explores the challenges associated with frontline practice in medicine, psychiatry, social work and law, and develops strategies to ensure respect for autonomy and human rights in care contexts.

Complete the survey https://essex.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3kNq1xtDDuHNFnE

 

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