UK Engineering Team Seeks Healthcare Providers To Test New Hand Washing Gadget

Wavewash; a soon to be launched hand washing gadget is being offered free to a selection of healthcare providers for product testing.

A hundred of the devices, which aid and encourage better hand washing, are available for organisations such as care homes, hospices, nursing homes and GP surgeries.

Fitted above any sink, Wavewash starts a light-up timer when it is activated by a user with a wave of their hand. The timer gives users an indication of how long they should be washing their hands in order to kill germs and prevent the spread of coronavirus.

The device is intended for use by healthcare providers to help staff, patients and visitors to wash their hands more thoroughly.

To be launched in April, Wavewash can also be used in the toilets of businesses including retailers, pubs, cafes and restaurants to improve hand hygiene and reduce the spread of germs and viruses. It is also suitable for use at home.

Wavewash is being developed by a team of British engineers who’ve managed to develop the product in response to the coronavirus outbreak within just 30 days. The team was inspired after speaking to doctors and nurses about the problems caused by people failing to properly wash their hands.

Martin Hurworth from the Wavewash team said:

“It’s absolutely vital that we all wash our hands properly to control the spread of coronavirus and healthcare providers depend on patients, staff and any permitted visitors to do the same.

“Health authorities around the world are urging us to wash our hands for 20 second using soap and water every time as it’s one of the easiest and most effective ways we can avoid getting sick and spreading germs and viruses to others.

“Unfortunately, accurately counting to 20 seconds is actually pretty hard, even if you sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice and lots of people cut corners and forget to wash their hands for that long… and, of course, some people overlook washing their hands completely, which is disgusting.

“Wavewash aims to solve all of these problems. It’s a smart but noticeable device which reminds people to wash their hands more thoroughly and helps them to do it.

“We’ll be launching Wavewash commercially soon, but because healthcare providers need help now, we’re offering it to them before anyone else, completely free.”

Wavewash is a simple and seamless tech solution that’s inspired by the ‘nudge theory’ of behavioural science. The gadget works using a non-contact sensor, so there’s no need to touch the device at all. It can also be fitted to virtually any surface using screws or a self-adhesive pad that’s included and its smooth surface avoids the build-up of dirt and germs.

Health authorities around the world, including Public Health England and the NHS recommend that everyone should wash their hands for at least 20 seconds using soap and water to easily and effectively kill the microorganisms which can cause illness, including COVID-19 coronavirus.

The makers of Wavewash hope that the device will lead to more people thoroughly washing their hands now and in future.

Healthcare providers that would like to apply for free Wavewash units should contact trial@wavewash.co.uk or call 01603 343 727.

For more information about Wavewash, visit www.wavewash.co.uk.

 

 

 

 

 

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