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Dementia Deaths In Scotland Now Double 2007 Figures

Deaths caused by dementia continue to rise across Scotland according to provisional figures released today by National Records of Scotland.

The figures show deaths caused by Alzheimer’s and other dementias increased in the third quarter of 2017 by 13.6 per cent to 861. These deaths now account for 10 per cent of all deaths, doubled from the 5 per cent recorded a decade ago.

This is a continuing trend that has been seen in reports from the National Records of Scotland throughout the year. Both the first and second quarters of 2017 also noted rises in the number of deaths caused by dementia.

Although the report notes the way these deaths are recorded has changed, this is a trend that is becoming indisputable.

Dr Matthew Norton, Director of Policy at Alzheimer’s Research UK, the UK’s leading dementia research charity, said:

“Data continues to confirm that the growing scale and impact of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias cannot be ignored. Deaths caused by dementia are not only increasing in Scotland and across the rest of the UK, but data from the World Health Organization shows deaths are expected to triple around the world by 2050.

“Governments must acknowledge the increasing number of people who are living with the condition and commit to bringing an end to the fear, harm and heartbreak caused by dementia. Great advancements in research are helping people to live longer than ever before and that same innovative approach can help bring about the first life-changing treatment for dementia, but only if research is given priority.

“We are asking the UK government to make dementia research an explicit part of future health care and life science strategies and to increase annual investment in dementia research to a minimum of £132m by 2022.”


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